Scripture

Home Learning Scripture

How to Love God More

A top Christian question is, “How can I love God more?”

How can I:

  • Manage my affections?
  • Feel more thankful?
  • Be more consistent in my love?

What makes for a good Christian attitude? Let’s look at four steps to loving God more.

What’s in Your Heart, Christian? (Most People Miss This)

Painting of Jeremiah standing by the ruined temple

Christians want an eternal perspective. They want to know how to respond to sorrow and sin in the world and in their own hearts. But how?

Jeremiah standing by the ruined temple

Since these are matters of the heart, the answer begins with a heart examination. When we look within, what do we find?

Running with God’s Word: Yielding to the Character of God

Every July in Pamplona, 200 to 300 people go to the hospital for contusions and falling injuries. It is the famous “running of the bulls.”

How would it be to stand in that narrow Spanish street, seeing the stampede come at you? There are only two choices: you hide, or you join.

That’s what God’s word is like to us. Hebrews 4:12 calls it a double-edged sword, quick and powerful.

As Christians, we face a choice: will we dodge the oncoming force of the character of God? Will we miss the whole frightening thing, or will we choose to place ourselves directly in its path?

What You’re Forgetting When Your Faith Is Weak

Sometimes it’s hard to pray. Sometimes it feels like you’re repeating words, not talking to a person. From this we may even wonder if our faith is weak.

When that happens, what are we forgetting? What is missing?

You’re a Legalist If You Draw a Clear Moral Line?

Man by a cross kneeling down and praying

In the Gospels we see Jesus drawing one clear moral line after another. But today we are told it is the legalist or the Pharisee who draws moral lines.

Thus, when pastors release the Nashville Statement or similar statements of belief, the accusers salivate. The wolves descend.

“How dare you agree with Scripture.”

“It’s [the current year]!”

“How un-Christlike.”

What are we to make of this?