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Social Justice and Scripture: Untie the Knot Pt.19

According to Scripture, what is justice? Or what is judgment? (They are often interchangeable.)

Judgment always involves stopping and punishing a wrong-doer. That is the common feature when Scripture speaks of it. If no one stole from another or harmed another, there would be no need for society to provide judgment or justice. The need arises because men initiate force. Someone must judge between conflicting parties to prevent a feud.

Introducing My Website

Hello, and thank you for reading.

I’m Cody Libolt. I’m a worship leader, a music teacher, and a graduate of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville. At this blog I explore questions about Christian Life, Reason, and Faith.

Cody and Sasha

“Social Justice”

The Southern Blog recently posted an article on a question close to my heart: what do Christian leaders need to think, say, and do about the political changes rocking our country?

The article was called “Religious liberty, political engagement, and the future of ministry.” In it, Boyce College Professor Bryan Baise explained that Christian leaders should not be apathetic to political change, but should, “Learn about the nature of God and government,” and “read widely the ideas that shaped our nation.”

Thanks Obama.

After our move my wife has been working to get us a new health insurance plan.

After 3 months of phone calls and paperwork, we just found out the company thinks our “case is closed.”

We have no idea why.

So…

We’re starting over and it’s going to take several more months.

Yikes.

Our two kids are due for their pediatrician appointments, so I guess we’re just paying out of pocket.

Sasha told me she feels like she let our family down.

No, I told her.

Obama let our family down.


How have Obama and the other big-government do-gooders let your family down? Share your story, so I can help make it known.

 

Refugees and Reporting

Like me, you’re probably wanting to know what’s happening with the Syrian refugees.

These are people. Families. If you’ve seen a picture of a three-year-old Syrian boy dead, you know that something absolutely must be done. We should be ashamed if our hearts were not big enough to help these human beings—these image-bearers of God Himself—in their time of distress.

So then, what are the facts? What’s the right thing to do? Is President Obama’s plan to admit 10,000 Syrian refugees moral?