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You’re a Legalist If You Draw a Clear Moral Line?

Man by a cross kneeling down and praying

In the Gospels we see Jesus drawing one clear moral line after another. But today we are told it is the legalist or the Pharisee who draws moral lines.

Thus, when pastors release the Nashville Statement or similar statements of belief, the accusers salivate. The wolves descend.

“How dare you agree with Scripture.”

“It’s [the current year]!”

“How un-Christlike.”

What are we to make of this?

A Better Prayer Life

I don’t feel like praying. I almost never do.

This used to slow me down, but here are some principles that have greatly helped.

Why don’t I feel like praying?

I have an aversion to changes of context. If I’m doing chores around the house, I want to keep doing them. If I’m reading or typing at my computer, I want to keep doing that. When it’s time to go to bed, I don’t want to. And when it’s time to get out of bed I don’t want to. It takes emotional energy to shift your context, to drop an activity, and to orient yourself to a new one.

How to Be Holy (Old Testament Style)

For the good, the bad, and the uncomfortable, go to the Old Testament. Because it’s largely a narrative, the Old Testament shows cause and effect—of every kind. You can trust it to tell the juicy parts.

I want to show you some match-ups I discovered. It’s a set of revealing comparisons of those who got it right and those who didn’t.

I found two principles:

1. Why holiness matters.

2. How people become holy.

I’ll share these principles at the end. But see if you can find them yourself in the following comparisons:

Does Philosophy Bow the Knee to Scripture?

One of the most important questions for the Christian thinker is:

How does the truth of Scripture relate to the truth of philosophy, or science, or history?

If we put it in terms of “revelation,” it becomes: How does special revelation relate to general revelation?

Why Believe the Bible? Evidentialism.

Wikimedia Commons

In response to a previous post, a friend of mine asked, “How can you know that the Bible is true, that it is inspired by God, or that it is inerrant, without appealing to the Bible as the source for these claims?”

My friend was pointing out that Christians tend to make a circular claim: We know the Bible is true because it is God’s word–We know it is God’s word because it says it is–God wouldn’t lie.

Of course, this answer fails to address the unbeliever’s question: “What if someone else wrote the Bible and only claimed it was from God?”