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Renew Your Passion for Jesus

When Scripture records a warning to Christians, take note. It’s a clue: other Christians had these problems and we probably will too.

Look at Revelation 2:4 with its warning against losing our first love. There is danger: it can happen. The loss of our first love can be gradual and unwitting.

How do we renew our passion for Jesus?

The basic answer is: Think again about your reason for loving Him in the first place.

Inductionism: A Philosophical System

In this blog I advocate the principle that “if we will live,” we must choose to value our own lives, our reason, and our faith. I seek to reproduce my philosophical convictions in other people. For the sake of clarity, I’ve created an outline of my system. This and future posts will expound my system.

A philosophical system must answer three basic kinds of questions: What kind of world is it? Why am I able to know it? How will I act? The central tenets of my philosophy are epistemological objectivism and a Christian morality of rational self-interest.

Setting Your Heart on God and His Character

I want to tell you about a passage in Scripture that has really impacted me.

2 Chronicles 12:14 says, “He did evil because he had not set his heart on seeking the LORD.”

It’s a choice to set your heart on the Lord.

What Did Jesus Mean By “Judge Not”?

close-up of a the eye of a person thinking

Those two words, “judge not,” can threaten to stop a dialogue.

But two more words can restart it: “keep reading.”

The “judge not” in Matthew 7:1 is not the end of the chapter.

By the third verse Jesus has pointed out that we should indeed be judging our own spiritual state:

“And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?”

By the fifth verse Jesus commands that a hypocrite ought to take the beam out of his own eye:

“And then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.”

Why Isn’t Induction Circular?

A friend asked a question about my theory of knowledge: “It seems that your epistemology is pretty circular—You know by reasoning. How do you know that you know by reasoning? Well, you reasoned that you do.”

The Problem

He was asking about what has been called “the problem of method.” If it is true that we gain knowledge by a certain method, then we also gain “knowledge of method” by that very same method; so how did we discover the method in the first place? If at first we did not know anything about the method, then how, without such knowledge, were we able to gain it?

How do we know that, “To know is to reason about observations”? Is the method of induction circular?