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How Do I Grow in Faithfulness?

How do I grow in faithfulness? That’s the question we’ll explore over the next several posts. The challenge is how to be more consistently obedient to the Lord.

What Did Jesus Mean By “Judge Not”?

close-up of a the eye of a person thinking

Those two words, “judge not,” can threaten to stop a dialogue.

But two more words can restart it: “keep reading.”

The “judge not” in Matthew 7:1 is not the end of the chapter.

By the third verse Jesus has pointed out that we should indeed be judging our own spiritual state:

“And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?”

By the fifth verse Jesus commands that a hypocrite ought to take the beam out of his own eye:

“And then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.”

44 Philosophical Blunders

This page gives my answers to 44 of my favorite bad ideas in philosophy, along with my own condensed answers. It functions as an outline of much of my philosophical project, especially focusing on epistemology. Many future posts will elaborate on the points found here.

As you read the blunders, try quizzing yourself. If you know it’s wrong, can you explain the issue? Enjoy!

What You’re Forgetting When Your Faith Is Weak

Sometimes it’s hard to pray. Sometimes it feels like you’re repeating words, not talking to a person. From this we may even wonder if our faith is weak.

When that happens, what are we forgetting? What is missing?

How to Surrender No Premise

When disputing or discussing, it’s common to grant an opponent’s premise for the sake of argument. But we don’t always need to, and it’s not always desirable.

Take this example:

One who supports “Planned Parenthood” and the harvesting of infant body parts argues as follows:

“I thought that according to Christianity all babies go to heaven anyway. So why do you care?”

See what the person is doing? He’s not advocating for his own position, but seeking merely to reduce the Christian view to absurdity.