Reason

Home Learning Reason

Inductionism: A Philosophical System

In this blog I advocate the principle that “if we will live,” we must choose to value our own lives, our reason, and our faith. I seek to reproduce my philosophical convictions in other people. For the sake of clarity, I’ve created an outline of my system. This and future posts will expound my system.

A philosophical system must answer three basic kinds of questions: What kind of world is it? Why am I able to know it? How will I act? The central tenets of my philosophy are epistemological objectivism and a Christian morality of rational self-interest.

Inductionism: What’s the Plan?

Wikimedia Commons

Where are we headed? Today I want to show a brief outline of the philosophic system I advocate, which I call Inductionism.

My philosophy has three main normative principles:

1) Seek your own life by gaining knowledge.

2) Gain knowledge by inductive reason.

3) Base your faith on facts.

Top 10 Lessons in Thinking

Here are my favorite principles of logic and reasoning, collected from Leonard Peikoff’s Objectivism: the Philosophy of Ayn Rand.

While these do stand on their own, they become most useful if you study them individually and in depth. For that, I recommend Peikoff’s book.

John Locke on Faith

First Comment!

Hooray for my first reader comment!

I want to encourage interaction at my blog, so I’ll reproduce the comment and my response:

 

A friend asked:

“What does ‘faith’ mean in this context? To come later?”

He wanted to know what I mean by faith. I wrote back:

“Here faith means trusting God. It means believing that God has spoken, and believing God’s promises. Faith comes at the conclusion of a reasoning process–not as the presupposition to it.”

40 Points on Thinking

If you have read my Top 10 Lessons in Thinking, this is a deeper look. Again, the ideas are from Leonard Peikoff.

I sequenced this list so as to follow a flow. Enjoy!